September 4th, 2003

Semiformalishmaybe

F and Y and I

Just got back from the PUSH thing.. it really went well. It wasn'thuge, but considering the short notice, and considering that it washalf people we haven't met before, I think it's a really good firststep. It went well, we have a topic for the next meeting, we've settledon a (different) meeting day of the week, and we all got to know eachother a bit. All we need to do is more flyering, find a way to connectto the local (probably large) secular jewish factions (I think I mightknow how), and do some high-profile things like debates with christiangroups, and things will go well. It's such a good feeling that we've steppedbeyond the size of the summer group into something new. As a slight downside,I might need to give up part of Zets -- meetings will now be on Wednesdaysat 9. Oh well.

Before that, there was a party at my boss's place. It was pretty fun -- sawsome people at work in a more casual environment, good catered food, andsome conversation. Of course, I'm a bit of a wallflower at parties, butit didn't work out too badly -- I was standing around for probably lessthan half the time I was there.
(section not shown)

Oh, this story on disaster recovery is really amazing. It's great whenbusinesses arn't shortsighted enough tofollow good practices, and *ahem* listen to the advice of people who knowbetter.

Ahh, yes, the title. Frank, Yui, and I might be reunited. Dr Forrester left thefamily some time back, but my sister's thinking about sending the littleIggies back my way. I might give up the computer room, or large parts of it,as I don't need it so much anymore with my laptop. Iggies!

In Philosophy of Science today, it was discussed how, during much earliertimes, universities were run by the church (which I knew), but were aseperate wing with often very different theology (which I did not know)that conflicted with the conservative 'cathedral' side of the church.Apparently over the years, as the university clergy continued toassimilate knowledge that trickled in through trade with arab nations(knowledge that was all greek in origin, but long-lost to the west), thecathedral clergy became increasingly hostile to the sciences, as it putlimits on the power of their god. Said sciences, at the time, did havea lot of mystic stuff mixed in, including stuff on astrology andsimilar. I'd be tempted to say that it was forming a christian versionof Sufism, although I don't know enough details to know if that's actuallya decent analogy. So, the cathedral clergy came up with a plan, and inventedwhat later became the modern skeptic tradition in order to defuse thescientific revolution at the time, drying them up and returning people tothe value of faith. It apparently worked, but not quite the way theythought -- the mysticism and a lot of old sciences were pulled apart by theaction, but the result was a purer science, one that led, eventually,to deism and other threats to the power of the church. It's an interestinginterpretation of history, and I'm glad my professor gave it to us. Such a beautiful mistake.

I left my laptop at work today -- it's busy compiling some stuff for meso my ethernet card will continue to work with a kernel update redhatgave us. My wireless networking card is finally in, and with luck, it'llwork. It struck me on my way home today how amazing it is that we're allsuch consumers that we really would more likely go to events or do thingsif we think that normally they'd cost more, or cost money, than ifthey were always free. That magical word 'exclusive' invokes the littlegreedy bastard inside all of us, but the magical thing is, that bastardwill screw us over in the end. We won't be as happy as we could be...