Pat Gunn (dachte) wrote,
Pat Gunn
dachte

River of Lost Luggage

Recently, it seems I must've been dropping random things of mine all overtown -- a piece of paper I lost regarding my credit union account at CMUshowed up, sans envelope, in my CMU mailbox, and my copy of the book ofmormon and a letter both showed up sitting in my chair at work. A few otherdocuments I know I've recieved before have shown up in my mailbox at home.I don't think I've ever had this happen to me before, and I'm certainlygrateful to the people who must be picking up after me and returning my stuff..

I recently was talking with a friend on database issues and the delay of thenext version of Windows, and the conversation drifted into databases infilesystems, and in general how nice an interface databases provide to data,and why it would be cool to be able to query your email from any app, if itwere in a database. It reminds me of a design addition in Postgres thatI'd like to see -- suitcase databases. Normally in Postgres, databases livein a weird format inside of the postgres user's homedir, and people needpermission to create databases, and it's hard for them to manage them.Suitcase databases would be a single-file self-contained databases thatpeople could copy around and manage all the file aspects of themselves.pgsql and the postgres libraries would need to be extended to be able toconnect to files, and thus postgres could be entirely user-side for suchconnections (instead of a standard daemon). The database would ideally be ina format that wouldn't break between versions of postgres. This would make iteasy for people to, for example, keep their mail in a real SQL database butstill easily be able to move it just as they can move their Inbox around, withno need to do a dump and a restore and the like, and with actually no need for asystemwide postgres install. Thinking about it, the idea of using a nice SQLdatabase to store all the data for any program one might want to run, it's nota bad idea.

I recently switched from rxvt to rxvt-unicode. Redhat's move to unicode broke rxvtin some apps, meaning that manpages and curses-based applications don't workright. rxvt-unicode .. it does fix the unicode-related problems in rxvt, butintroduces new ones. The most noticable are that text that's supposed to bebold ends up being reverse-coloured, and that the code is a lot more fragile(I tried to fix the bolding myself, but it appears to have branched in a badway from rxvt).. It also relies on yodl, a documentation format that's long beenabandoned by it's authors (who tell us to use something else on their webpage),so I need to comment out where it tries to make its manpages or it won't build.

This makes me really angry.Fortunately, there are sites like TheocracyWatch around, so we canat least be aware of the things that need to be fixed once power is pried fromrepublican hands.Either that, or we can use this site to fantasize about meteors hitting D.C.

Tags: tech
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