Pat Gunn (dachte) wrote,
Pat Gunn
dachte

Congratulations, you've bombed one of your own cities!

One of the many people in the American Military occupying Iraq, the famous Private England, was convicted (thankfully) recently, and faces ten years in prison for her actions. As I have stated before, I feel that this is too light a punishment, and that all those involved should be perhaps tried in a localish-but-not-owned court (Saudi? Persian?) for their atrocities, recieving their punishment as decided in said country. These are very bad people.. England offers an apology that makes it absolutely clear that she's sorry for all the wrong things, and mixes pitiful excuses into said apology. She:

  • Apologies for being in the photos rather than apologises for the events/treatment that the photos cover
  • Regrets attacks on "coalition" forces for the photos, again ignoring that the fact that it was not that the photos were made that made people so angry so much as what the photos covered
  • Blames her abuse of other human beings on a relationship she had with another military person
In turn, said other military person blames lack of leadership and supervision for the actions. I would *hope* that what keeps people treating each other in a civilised fashion doesn't disappear as soon as threat from external authority disappears.. but perhaps the instant growth of organised crime and free-for-all by some parts of New Orleans tells us something about the way a lot of people operate. This is part of the reason I dislike prescriptive morality (for adults, anyhow) -- apart from lacking philosophical justification, it dissolves in the absence of authority and is poor at adapting to new situations in a principled way.

On a completely different topic, in a recent lab meeting I noticed how in English, the word "remember" is imprecise. It can be used to ask someone to memorise something (e.g. "remember this") or to recall something (e.g. "can you remember"). This is kind of messy.

If you're into space, this might be interesting.

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