Pat Gunn (dachte) wrote,
Pat Gunn
dachte

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The Hills Shall Come To Us

At the 61c, watching the rain pour down and fluidise the streets. It seems that rain always brings a change in weather, like another turning of the minute hand on the clock - the second hand may accumulate energy, but the minute hand is what spends that energy and realises the pending change. The hills between Cleveland and Columbus are like that - flat, but occasionally there were big slants downwards that would foretell lasting changes in the terrain - it would get flatter as another place another age of glaciers judged differently. Rain is much like that, but it represents the extroverted hills of modern times.

A flash of memory from a conversation on rings - remembering a trip to DC I made with Nicole for her to have some piece of jewelry (or was it a watch?) repaired - while we waited we spent a good amount of time looking at expensive jewelry. She had a particular liking of things made of coral, and so we looked at all sorts of things of the sort in that mall... On one level I was a bit weirded out at how freely she spent money (reminded me of my family, which she fit into fairly well when she met them, I think), but on another I did appreciate the aesthetics. Falling back into that mindset, it felt like she was a hand reaching out inviting me into a lifestyle I consciously rejected, which I guess was a big theme of my relationship with her. If I had grown up the way I was supposed to, maybe I would've been a perfect companion for her. I wonder if that's true.. I think the social/economic class one is born into and raised in must affect relationships in interesting ways, an area I probably should think about further. It was one of those memories and lines of thought that totally distorts time though, when I came out of it, I didn't actually miss any conversation. Thinking-time and dream-time seem to have that in common - it's possible to spend hours staring off into space with only a few thoughts (recorded, at least) while enough to write a book can happen in an instant.

I never learned much Javascript - the occasion never came up to get deeply into it. Thinking about how websites work (and how some of them are increasingly like applications), I've been frustrated at issues with overuse of communication between the browser and the webserver. It seems like a richer client would often be welcome, one that would have local operations on cached copies of server data. HTML isn't well suited for that - one of the things I don't know about Javascript that I'm wondering about is how rich the local runtime is and what it has permission to do. Can it store data in places outside the browser's cookie store? I understand that Flash can do this because it's often told me "application X has requested the ability to store 5 megs of data on your system" - I wonder if the Javascript runtime can do the same thing. It might be cool to have, for example, a per-site SQL database that Javascript could query so that some websites could act more like applications (and not require so much bandwidth due to being extremely thin clients).

I am extremely enthused to see, courtesy slashdot, that freenode is banning tor connections due to some groups finally doing things that make people uncomfortable with lack of responsibility for one's connection. I think it's tragic that the EFF and other cultural institutions have embraced tor for quite some time - hopefully things will start to go the other way.

Tags: tech
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