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White Fractions

Inherent Challenges in Drawing Faces

(song is here)I love songs that sound old, sad, and tired. On the other hand, this song could be be fantastic in a lively punk remix.

More blather about drawing:Inattentional Blindness: focus on one object or set of objects effectively makes another obscure. This is a learning process, part of the general tendency in thought to learn to think less and achieve better results (Perl virtue: Laziness!). Fusiform gyrus: GPU for these kinds of tasks. Drawing human form is so difficult because we need to undo some of that optimisation and force ourself to attend to and create the details that we normally overlook, all so we generate the "this is usual, nothing to see here" bits that let the viewer of a sketch focus on the particularly interesting bits. Sketching well is thus learning to be boring/regular enough in the right areas to qualify us for the difficult bits of face representation (maybe like how a business has to have competent-enough non-core-competency bits to support the interesting and difficult bits that tie into their revenue model).

As much as it theoretically makes sense to start with the outline of a head and mentally place markers where the features should be, I seem to be at my best when sketching faces to draw the nose first and work outwards from there. This is because to me the way the nose flows into other face features is the biggest marker of the later, difficult judgements in how well I've drawn a face. I spend a lot of time thinking about noses now - the flow of the upper part into the eye cavity and eyebrows, the nostrils and ball-like bit that sticks out between them, and thanks to Elise the slight line that goes from the side of the nostrils around and down to the edges of the mouth. It's a strange arrangement to do the area of deeper judgement first, because once I have the face, drawing the head around it is still something I often mess up, and what once looked ok and reasonably real ends up losing that visual effect. All the bits of my drawing need work, but placing a head around a face needs particular attention. The dividing a circle idea can be reverse engineered, but it takes a bit of additional complication when I have to mentally curve that line to account for head angle and when I'm working at it from the other end. Maybe sometime I'll get it right.

Maybe.

On friday my multi-day migraine peaked and I had to stay home from work. Today I walked out to 「Your Inner Vagabond」, which I now remember having been to a few times courtesy of other people's cars. Their baklava isn't that great, but they have an excellent tea selection and I like the atmosphere of the place. I bumped into a few people I know (to varying degrees) here who probably don't know each other. Fits of depressive panic plagued me for several parts of the hike, although they're doing in general an excellent job of making me nonfunctional (and probably very whiny, which is partly why I'm trying not to blog too often) whenever they come out. Things seem to be slowly getting worse on that front.

There is a Hegel reading group starting up that I might attend - it's been awhile since I've read him, and it might be interesting.

It seems another batch of people has graduated CMU and is heading off into the real world. There arn't that many people left, I suspect, from when I was socially active at CMU. *vague wavings of goodbye*

It's probably a good time to start the walk back.

Comments

Was nice to run into you. :)
Actually, I quite agree. Most of the staff, I think, feel that the chocolate and raspberry baklavas are inauthentic and over-sweetened. (Still, they're popular sellers...) Different bakery from the one that does the rest of our desserts.

Do drop by again sometime -- though I'd recommend either hopping a bus or walking in cooler weather. :)