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Semiformalishmaybe

Mythopoetics

I haven't heard a lot from this movement for awhile; it may have fallen apart, but they're probably worth placing down on the map-of-terms, at least for people younger than me. The Mythopoetics were a group of social movements designed for men to step outside of modern society and "be men"; the movement was designed partly as a response to modern society, and partly as a response to second-wave feminism. They sought to perform masculine bonding outside the shifts in identity that were happening because of second-wave feminism (which they felt were taking essential masculinity away from men) and modernism (likewise). The movements were not cohesive, and the degree to which they were a response to feminism versus modern society differed. You'd hear about them organising hiking trips out to the middle of nowhere, doing primal screams, and otherwise embracing frontier values; this is the sort that's generally really into Boy Scouts.

Some of them were misogynist, but most of them didn't seem to be. They generally did believe that men and women have different essential natures, but at least most of those I've met seemed to meet the minimal definition of feminism, and even as they saw natural/necessary differences between men and women they seemed to be generally for equality of opportunity in the workplace and legal equality.

Unlike MRAs, I believe they're baseline acceptable; their commitment to gender-identities is bothersome to me as a gender-role abolitionist, as my specific intuitions for social justice is to deconstruct gender-identity/gender-role entirely, leaving just the bare genetic XX/XY distinction with little content associated with it, but I believe it's appropriate to tolerate anyone or any movement on-the-topic that fits baseline feminism. I have zero interest in joining them though, and in the past I've been offended when people, sensing my lack of a male gender-identity/gender-role, pushed me to come along with them (or go) on these things.

My accepting them doesn't mean I'm going to stop pushing gender-role abolition (a term, I add, is something I actually only discovered in the last few years, but which described the second-wave faction I was in much further back), it just means that I am inclined to consider their views non-barriers to reasonable interaction.

There's a chance I might be writing about a movement that's by now pretty dead; have any of you heard anything from these movements recently?

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